Dream Town Realty

312.265.8000

Join Dream Town:

or

Join With Email:

By joining you agree to our terms of service.

Douglas
Real Estate and Neighborhood Information

Douglas Overview

Douglas is a part of Bronzeville.

As one of Chicago's earliest settlements, Douglas has a rich and patriotic heritage. Conveniently located along the lakefront between the South Loop and Bronzeville, the neighborhood has the advantage of being a few short miles from downtown, while still sitting on Lake Michigan's beautiful shoreline. A number of public parks serve the community member's recreational needs. Beach access, baseball fields, bike paths, gardening clubs, softball leagues and summer day camps play a part in the daily Douglas lifestyle where neighbors assemble for old-fashioned fun and community bonding.

0 Douglas Homes For Sale

Showing 1 - 0 of 0 View all 0 homes

The urban feel of this Chicago neighborhood is part of its charm. Long blocks are dotted with trees and edged by wide sidewalks where local children play alongside the community’s shared backyard—the namesake public park.

The majority of homes in Douglas Park neighborhood occupy multi-unit residential buildings, which include a large concentration of graystone row houses—remnants of the area’s first batch of inhabitants. Many of these stately residences have been divided up into two- and three-bedroom flats to create affordable properties with plenty of space to raise a family, starting around $70,000 per unit.

There’s a section of newer development along Fairfield Avenue, just north of one of the neighborhood’s hospitals. Recently constructed brick walkups line the adjacent residential streets. These single-family homes, starting closer to $200,000, typically offer three bedrooms and a contemporary layout with modern amenities. Additional projects are in the works along California Avenue and other parts of Douglas Park, bringing renewed interest to the neighborhood both from young families and first-time owners.

There are also a number of existing, yet recently built flats and half-duplexes that sell for between $300,000 and $400,000 in Douglas Park, in addition to rows of new townhouses on Albany Avenue (situated right on the edge of the park). Like other contemporary housing in Douglas Park neighborhood, these homes have beautiful finishes such as hardwood floors, granite kitchen countertops and rooftop decks—some with a magnificent view of the park, which is probably the biggest backyard you can get in the city of Chicago. Many of these properties start in the low $400,000s and go as high as $460,000.

Homebuyers will also discover detached single-family homes starting in the low $100,000s in Douglas Park. These include many older one- and two-story, simple frame houses and traditional brick structures with quaint front porches. But there’s versatility in the area’s real estate with some newer constructions designed in the traditional urban townhouse-style that start in the low to mid $200,000s. So families are sure to find plenty of affordable properties that provide sufficient room and privacy.


Douglas History

Around the periphery of one of Chicago’s largest parks rest quaint residential blocks with a rich architectural and cultural history that also boast two well-regarded hospitals and a smattering of restaurants and businesses. The near west side community of Douglas Park has gone through a nearly two-century-long cycle of growth, strife and renewal that has resulted in a lovely neighborhood setting, just minutes from downtown and immersed within an extensive expanse of green that is hard to come by in the big city.

During the late 1880s, the newly established West Park Commission set out to create three large parks on the west side with boulevards that linked the triad of recreational spaces. Humboldt, Garfield and Douglas parks emerged as a result, all designed by William Le Baron Jenney, who most notably served at the forefront of the development of the steel-framed skyscraper. Several of the city’s parks at this time had poor natural land conditions, including Douglas Park, which Jenney tackled by leveling the marshy terrain with a mixture of sand and manure from the Chicago Stock Yards. It may have been slightly stinky, but hey—it worked, didn’t it?

Full construction of the park took a while, though, as it was completed nearly 25 years later by renowned Prairie School architect Jens Jenson in an effort to reform and revitalize the network of west side recreation areas. As general superintendent and chief landscape architect of the entire West Park system, Jensen brought a new life to Douglas, Humboldt and Garfield parks. He added an ornate arcing entrance to Douglas Park, a formal garden known as Flower Hall and a reflecting pool. Later still, a fieldhouse was erected in 1928 by architects Michaelsen and Rognstad, who also added the Gold Dome Building to Garfield Park and a fieldhouse at Humboldt Park.

Although the park is a major draw to this west side Chicago neighborhood, the land not included in the park grounds is where folks started building homes and planting roots for a viable community. At first, there was a strong Jewish and Eastern European immigrant presence in the region. They owned all of the buildings and houses such as the two- and three-flat graystones and most of the surrounding businesses. The next wave of residents to settle down in Douglas Park were African American families emigrating to the northern industrial centers from southern states during the Great Migration in the decades following the Civil War. Most of the buildings remained in the hands of Jewish landlords, though some African Americans became homeowners in the area. A half-century of peace and quiet was disrupted in the post-Martin Luther King Jr. assassination riots and many retail shops and residential buildings in Douglas Park fell into disrepair. The subsequent closing of several major businesses in the area, including the relocation of the Sears, Roebuck and Co. headquarters building in neighboring Lawndale to Hoffman Estates, added to the strife that blanketed much of Chicago’s southwest side during this period. The park itself remained a refuge for local residents, who immersed themselves in activities and seemingly endless green space.

The establishment of two major medical facilities in Douglas Park neighborhood has added a growing interest in redeveloping the region. Mount Sinai Hospital is located next to the park on the community’s northern end and St. Anthony Hospital was built at the park’s southern periphery. The hum of the hospitals has brought an influx of people to Douglas Park which contributed to an increase in restaurants and renovated roads.

For the past decade, rehabilitation of historic graystones and the construction of brand new homes have created a turning point for Douglas Park and many of the surrounding Chicago communities. New daycare facilities to accommodate the growing number of families, and programs such as Ravinia’s free cultural events and classes in the Lawndale and Douglas Park areas are serving to boost neighborhood unity and augment community services.


Dream Town Knows Douglas

As Chicago neighborhood experts, Dream Town has successfully sold properties in Douglas. Dream Town holds a well-earned reputation for its impressive sales volume and dedication to personal, attentive service. Benefit from the Dream Town advantage when selling your Douglas home. Utilizing state-of-the-art technology, Dream Town drives more sales than any other Chicago brokerage.

List With Us

2545 South DEARBORN, Chicago IL, 60616 #701
Sold For $510,000
3714 South Dr. Martin Luther King, Chicago IL, 60653 #
Sold For $775,000

The Sights of Douglas

Douglas Neighborhood Photo
Douglas Neighborhood Photo
Douglas Neighborhood Photo
Douglas Neighborhood Photo
Douglas Neighborhood Photo
Douglas Neighborhood Photo

Want More Chicago Photos?

Follow Us On Instagram

Schools In The Douglas Area

See grade levels, address, and scores for schools in the Douglas area.

School Type Grade Rating

Drake Elementary School

2710 South Dearborn St - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
1

Wells Preparatory Elementary Academy

249 East 37th St - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
3

National Teachers Elementary Academy

55 West Cermak Road - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
4

Santa Lucia School

3017 South Wells Street - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

St. Jerome School

2801 S Princeton Ave - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

De La Salle Institute

3455 S Wabash Ave - private

High 9-12
NR

Daystar School

1550 S. State Street - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Williams Multiplex Elementary School

2710 South Dearborn St - public

Preschool - Elementary PK-5
NR

Jane Addams High School

1814 S Union Ave - private

High 9-12
NR

Village Leadership Academy

800 S Wells St Ste 90 - private

Preschool - Middle PK-7
NR

Pershing West Elementary Magnet School

3200 South Calumet Ave - public

Elementary - Middle 4-8
NR

Old St. Marys School

1474 S. Michigan Ave - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Holy Angels Catholic School

750 East 40th Street - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

British International School of Chicago, South Loop

161 W. 9th Street - private

Preschool - High PK-12
NR

Jungman Elementary School

1746 South Miller St - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
4

Jones College Prep High School

700 South State Street - public

High 9-12
10

Chicago Military Academy High School

3519 South Giles Ave - public

High 9-12
8

Doolittle Elementary School

535 East 35th St - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
1

St Therese School

247 West 23rd Street - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Holy Angels Catholic School

750 E. 40th St. - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

School data provided by GreatSchools.School service boundaries are intended to be used as reference only. To verify enrollment eligibility for a property, contact the school directly. GreatSchools Ratings provided by GreatSchools.org.

Surrounding Neighborhoods

Neighbor Photo