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Vittum Park
Real Estate and Neighborhood Information

Vittum Park Overview

Vittum Park is a part of Garfield Ridge.

Emerging as a result from the aviation industry surrounding Midway Airport, this southwest Chicago neighborhood offers lovely bungalow-style housing and peaceful residential streets ideal for families just starting out and folks transitioning to the city. Vittum Park holds a very diverse culture in its small reaches on the outer boundaries of the city limits. Narrow lots, sidewalk-sliced lawns and long blocks conform to the typical grid pattern of Chicago neighborhoods. A sizeable community park is where Vittum Parkers convene to play a pickup game of baseball, hit the tennis ball around, and stretch the legs on the short walking trail. Inside the onsite fieldhouse, neighborhood children are welcome to participate in sports programs and recreational activities that include day camps and martial arts classes. Go ahead and work up an appetite because Vittum Park boasts a mini-selection of Mexican taquerias, American restaurants and casual bars to satiate your hunger – or thirst.

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Pristinely manicured lawns, well-spaced lots, and wide sidewalk-lined streets shaded by towering trees give the Chicago city neighborhood of Vittum Park a suburban air that has attracted a great number of local families to the southwest side.

Children playing, neighbors holding conversations over fences and American flags blowing in the wind are usual sights in this south Chicago neighborhood. The single-dwelling homes here were mostly built during the area’s housing boom of the 1940s and 1950s and lend a cozy, if ethereal post-war charm to the community. There are a few condominium units for sale, but the majority of the market here consists of bungalow-style homes that have been lovingly maintained.

The quaint redbrick bungalows that are common in many Chicago communities are also a staple of the residential architecture in Vittum Park. But sitting right next to that adorable little bungalow you will often find a very diverse assortment of housing from raised ranches to single-story frame houses to split-levels. Many of these dwellings have garage parking and sizeable yards that allow for summertime barbeques, private vegetable gardens and plenty of space for the kids to run around and expend some energy before trying to get them to go to bed.

Vittum Park History

A subdivision of the southwest side’s Garfield Ridge neighborhood, Vittum Park maintains a charming balance between suburb and city.

During the 19th century, speculators and farmers alike purchased tracks of land in the area, but the soggy prairies of this rural landscape proved difficult to cultivate, and most people stayed only a short time. One of the area’s earliest trailblazers was William Archer, commissioner of the Illinois & Michigan Canal. In 1835, Archer bought 240 acres between present-day Archer and Harlem avenues. Of course, Archer Avenue was named after the commissioner, and is the road most of the disappointed pioneers used to leave the neighborhood after the lands proved infertile. In 1853, former Chicago mayor John Wentworth bought up the territory just east of Archer’s property. The city of Chicago began to incorporate the land a little at a time, and by 1921, the entire area of Garfield Park (which included what would later become Vittum Park) was considered part of Chicago.

The 1920s brought hoards of immigrant Poles, who were fleeing the crumbling infrastructure of their homeland, to the newly annexed neighborhood. In 1926, the opening of the Chicago Municipal Airport (later to be renamed Midway) brought jobs, a thriving economy and a big reason for people to settle down in Garfield Ridge. Of course, just a few years later the onset of the Great Depression slowed the neighborhood’s development until after the war. It was during these post-war years that the population of Garfield Ridge skyrocketed, doubling during the 1940s and tripling during the 1950s. Employees of Midway airport were building single-family homes in the west side of the neighborhood, and it was also during this time period that the small pocket of Vittum Park saw a surge in residential construction.

Named for the newly built park (established in 1947) about which the tiny enclave sprouted, Vittum Park became a desirable corner of the Garfield Ridge neighborhood. The airport itself was steadily growing to become one of the world’s largest hubs, and life couldn’t have been sweeter.

That is, until the city of Chicago realized that the pint-size airport couldn’t possibly handle more traffic, and turned its aviation eyes further north, to Orchard Field Airport/Douglass Field (present-day O’Hare), an area that had been used since the early 1940s for manufacturing military planes and storing experimental and captured aircraft. During 1955, the first commercial flights took off from the new airfield, and in 1958 an international terminal was built. Still, the new northwest side airport didn’t really begin to affect Midway’s business until 1962, when a massive expansion project instantly transformed O’Hare into the new world’s busiest airport. Within its first year, more passengers went through O’Hare than had been through New York’s Ellis Island during its entire history. Chicago’s southern airport quickly became an afterthought.

The Vittum Park neighborhood remained in something of a standstill until the 1990s, when budget airlines prompted renewed interest in Midway airport. A public rapid transit line (the CTA Orange Line 'El') was installed in the area, connecting the airport and the surrounding neighborhoods with the downtown Loop, and people once again began to move into the area. These days, Vittum Park remains a predominately middle-class neighborhood—a wonderful place to raise a family, and a great spot for aviation-industry employees to lay down roots. The community boasts a fairly diverse makeup today with a mix of Caucasians, African-Americans, Latin-Americans (predominantly of Mexican heritage), even the area’s early Polish population is still well-represented.

Dream Town Knows Vittum Park

As Chicago neighborhood experts, Dream Town has successfully sold properties in Vittum Park. Dream Town holds a well-earned reputation for its impressive sales volume and dedication to personal, attentive service. Benefit from the Dream Town advantage when selling your Vittum Park home. Utilizing state-of-the-art technology, Dream Town drives more sales than any other Chicago brokerage.

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5574 South Archer, Chicago IL, 60638 #1A
Sold For $49,900

The Sights of Vittum Park

Vittum Park Neighborhood Photo
Vittum Park Neighborhood Photo

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Schools In The Vittum Park Area

See grade levels, address, and scores for schools in the Vittum Park area.

School Type Grade Rating

Kennedy High School

6325 West 56th St - public

High 9-12
3

Twain Elementary School

5134 South Lotus Ave - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
8

Drexel Elementary School

5407 West 36th St - public

Preschool - Elementary PK-6
3

St Richard Elementary School

5025 South Kenneth Avenue - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

St Jane De Chantal School

5201 South McVicker Avenue - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Our Lady of Charity School

3620 S 57th Ct - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Edwards Elementary School

4815 South Karlov Avenue - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
4

Kinzie Elementary School

5625 South Mobile Ave - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
8

Charles J Sahs Elementary School

5001 South Long Ave - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
6

Our Lady of the Snows School

4810 South Leamington Avenue - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Gloria Dei Lutheran School

5259 South Major Avenue - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Kid'z Colony

6287 South Archer Avenue - private

Elementary K
NR

Edison Elementary School

4100 Scoville Ave - public

Preschool - Elementary PK-5
5

Hearst Elementary School

4640 South Lamon Ave - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
2

Abe Lincoln Elementary School

3545 South 61st Ave - public

Preschool - Elementary PK-6
5

Academy For Global Citizenship

4647 West 47th Street - charter

Elementary - Middle K-8
4

Pasteur Elementary School

5825 South Kostner Ave - public

Preschool - Middle PK-8
5

Curie Metropolitan High School

4959 South Archer Ave - public

High 9-12
1

St. Bruno School

4839 S Harding Ave - private

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

Central Stickney School District 110

5001 South Long Ave -

Preschool - Middle PK-8
NR

School data provided by GreatSchools.School service boundaries are intended to be used as reference only. To verify enrollment eligibility for a property, contact the school directly. GreatSchools Ratings provided by GreatSchools.org.

Surrounding Neighborhoods

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